Council

President:
Distinguished Professor S.J. Sean Tsai, Ph.D.
(College of Medicine National Cheng Kung University Tainan, Taiwan)
President’s message

Endometriosis (and adenomyosis) is nearly a life-long disease, which severely reduces the life qualify of affected women and their families. It is also a heavy financial burden for patients and the healthcare system. Unfortunately, there is no cure for endometriosis so far. This is because endometriosis is a multifactorial disease that involves gene-gene, gene-environment, and physio-psychosocial interactions. Until now, the etiology of endometriosis remains largely uncharacterized. Therefore, more efforts in delineating the disease pathophysiology are needed in order to develop more efficacious therapeutic regimens.


The Asian Society of Endometriosis and Adenomyosis (ASEA) landed its ground in 2010 in Shanghai, China by scientists and clinicians from China, Japan, Korea,Taiwan, and Turkey. The member countries now have exceeded 14 and continue to increase. The ultimate goal of ASEA is to find the unmet medical needs for endometriosis and adenomyosis. To achieve this goal, scientists, physicians, healthcare providers, and even affected individuals need to work together to dig out the hidden facts of this disease. The establishment of ASEA provides an international platform for researchers/physicians in all areas of Asian countries to exchange their medical experience, to foster their surgical techniques, and to advance their scientific knowledge via the annual meeting and bilateral visiting. However, there are more to do than these regular routines. Critical issues such as more funding for endometriosis research, better patient care and disease management, accurate noninvasive diagnosis tools, and most importantly, developing effective therapeutic regimens to make endometriosis history await us to tackle.


Being the fourth president of ASEA, it gives me the privilege and pleasure to portray the mission we need to accomplish in the battle ground against endometriosis. First, raise the awareness of this disease. Ignorance brings contempt and harm. Lack of knowledge about endometriosis in general population leads to the suffering from this disease without notice, not to mention seeking for professional medical help while ignorant government cuts funding for research and healthcare. It’s our duty to educate our fellow countrywomen (and men) the psychosocial and economic impacts of endometriosis and urge them to take the right act. Second, revisit the fundamental principle of endometriosis. Most of us are pre-conditioned by the current understanding of endometriotic etiology/pathology and, sadly, satisfied with that. However, treatments based on the current knowledge did not provide too much help in curing this disease. With the state-of-the-art techniques and previously unrevealed scientific concepts, we need to re-explore the basic of endometriosis. Researchers, basic and clinical, need to employ the new concepts such as influence of functional noncoding RNAs or gastrointestinal microbiota on disease etiology and effects of epigenetic modifications or exosomes on disease progression. Only fresh minds can lead us to the never-being-reached land and discover the hidden treasure for disease eradication.


Endometriosis, though seldom detrimental, is a living hell where nobody should be held in custody during the golden year of their life! Making endometriosis a curable or at least manageable physiological disorder is the Holy Grail that every member of this society aims to grasp. After all, life cannot be completed without the healthy better half!


With best regards,

Professor Sun-Wei Guo

Past President:
Professor Sun-Wei Guo, M.Med., M.Sc., Ph.D.
(Shanghai Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital Fudan University Shanghai China)

Professor Tasuku Harada

Past President:
Professor Tasuku Harada
(Tottori University, Japan)

Professor Yong Taik Lim

Past President:
Professor Yong Taik Lim
(The Catholic University of Korea)